My New Release: Crossing the Wide Forever

Crossing The Wide Forever 300 DPIIt was hard not to get lost in the research for this book. Not the technical data or anything like that, but rather the personal stories of the women that migrated west during the mid-1800s. Many of whom were white and from middle-class economic backgrounds. Slavery and massacres were prevalent during this time period and gravely impacted the lives of black and native women. Conflicts between anti-slavery and pro-slavery factions in the Kansas territory required farmers to carry firearms to the field with them. The heated debate over the extension of slavery into the territories west of Missouri were being hotly debated in Washington D.C., while in the Deep South succession was in serious discussion. A lot was going on in the 1850s. I tried to be strategic about where I placed this story because of that.

I hadn’t realized until I started this book how many first-person diaries were available. Many of the story details that might seem far-fetched, like the electrical storm on the plains, or the ghoulish skulls of long dead buffalo, are taken from first-person accounts. The women who made the journey west didn’t so much write about how they felt, maybe they kept those feelings private, but they did describe the day-to-day challenges of managing a traveling home (wagon) on the open prairie.

I also didn’t realize how many white women dressed as men to migrate west. I had this idea that one of the characters in Crossing the Wide Forever might disguise herself as male but I wasn’t sure how plausible that was. It turns out there were lots of reasons for white women to disguise themselves as men. Some were fleeing abusive relationships or hoping to avoid an unwanted marriage arrangement. Some found themselves in situations where they had to feed and care for their children alone. Many white women during this time had two options, get married or resort to prostitution. The third, more radical option was to dress as a man and find work. Only men had the luxury of finding decent paying jobs on the frontier. In many cases free black men and white men worked side-by-side.

One of my sources for the historical setting of Crossing the Wide Forever was a book by Peter Boag titled, Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past. Boag’s book contains stories of both men and women who cross-dressed. I can only assume that some women also cross dressed so that they could marry the woman they loved, as many of them did. Sex was not viewed as binary at the time and there was no real word for homosexuality so newspaper stories about these cross-dressing women rarely made any mention of sexual orientation or the role that may have played in the woman’s decision to dress in masculine clothing. Sometimes the undertaker was the only one to discover the true identity of many of these women when he prepared their body for burial.

Winslow Homer’s work as a watercolorist during the mid-1800s provided some of the basis for Lillie’s career path as a landscape painter in Crossing the Wide Forever. Lillie’s experiences as a woman in the male-dominated field of art were inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe’s early life. O’Keeffe overcame many obstacles to succeed as a painter. Some of what she had to say about art critics and how they interpreted her work through a misogynistic lens is heartening to read, especially if you’ve ever received a bad review.

This novel is not intended as a history lesson and it was my goal not to let historical detail bog down the story. But context is important. All of the research was simply to put the reader in Cody and Lillie’s world. The story is about adventure, about charting your own course, about believing in yourself, and ultimately about falling in love.

 

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Writing with D. Jackson Leigh and VK Powell

Defiant bottle

Photo by my wife, Evelyn Braddock.

“Coming in June, July, and August of 2018. Three humorous yet very romantic stories about three friends, written by three friends.” – D. Jackson Leigh

I couldn’t think of two writers (and friends) who would be more fun to collaborate with on a trilogy of romance novels set in the Deep South.

My pal and fellow Bold Strokes Books author, D. Jackson Leigh wrote a hilarious (almost true) story about how this trilogy came to life. What her blog post didn’t include was the whiskey bottle she carried lovingly from North Carolina to Northern California that launched the brainstorming session. If you haven’t checked out D. Jackson Leigh’s recap of the night in question you can read it here on the Bold Strokes Books blog.

I’m extremely excited about this series. D. Jackson Leigh beta reads all my novels and I feel that she encourages me to be a better writer. VK Powell is one of my favorite authors and Bold Strokes Books colleagues. I enjoy the wit and heart of her novels.

Here’s a recap of the three novellas in the Pine Cone series:

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Photo and book cover photos by Evelyn Braddock.

Take My Hand by Missouri Vaun: Art critics raved about the originality of Clay Cahill’s paintings in her first solo show in NYC. But she was unprepared for the psychological pressure that followed and the betrayal of someone she thought cared about her. Clay retreats to her hometown, Pine Cone, Ga. She takes a job at her grandfather’s garage driving the tow truck and sets her paints aside.

River Hemsworth owns a boutique art gallery in NYC and is busy mounting her next show when she receives a call from a lawyer in Pine Cone. River’s aunt has bequeathed her a local gallery. She arrives in the small town, intent on unloading the property immediately and returning to NYC, but then she wrecks her car and has to be rescued by a broodingly handsome tow truck driver. River is out of place in a town where the local’s idea of fashion is anything with a Carhart label. But slowly her perception begins to shift and so does Clay’s. For the first time in months, Clay’s inspired to paint. River has given rise to desires she never thought she’d feel again. And those desires must be expressed on canvas.

Take a Chance by D. Jackson Leigh: Trip Beaumont likes being a big fish in a small pond. There’s hardly an animal she can’t heal or a woman she can’t charm within fifty miles of Pine Cone, Ga. – except for the irritating and elusive new cop who keeps leaving parking tickets on her truck.

Canine officer Jamie Grant has never liked rule-breakers, but she’s especially incensed when she discovers Trip owns the veterinary truck that is constantly parked illegally around the small town. She’s searched carefully for a quiet, eclectic community to settle down with her gastric-challenged canine partner, Petunia. Instead, she finds herself on collision course with the woman who stole her girlfriend and broke her heart after an ill-conceived threesome in college.

Take Your Time by VK Powell: Grace Booker’s life is good—but not quite everything she wants. Her job as a county deputy has its challenges, but she enjoys helping people. Her most recent good deed, however, ends badly and Grace is left with a raucous African grey parrot, Dirty Harry, who hates her. When Harry becomes louder and more neurotic, Grace takes him to the new vet, Dr. Dani Wingate, and sparks fly when the woman instantly assumes Grace has been abusive to the bird.

Recently laid off from her dream job as a zoo veterinarian in a large northern city, Dr. Dani Wingate accepts a temporary position in tiny Pine Cone until an opportunity opens up back in the city. The only thing she wants more than a lesbian who can do uncomplicated is a one-way ticket out of Pine Cone.

 

 

Keep Reading in 2017

I had this big plan to write a blog post about new books for the New Year, but then somehow I missed January. It’s like the election happened in November and the next thing I knew it was February. I won’t even go into a rant about how invasive current events are to the creative process. There’s a lot of noise out there, and rightly so. This is the time when we should all be paying attention and making our voices heard. But that’s not really what this post is about. I’m going to take a moment, take a breather, and just talk about books.

January and February have been busy months for me in terms of newly released books with Bold Strokes Books. I thought I’d take a minute to highlight each in case you missed them.

The last two installments in the Nash Wiley series came out in January and February. They were part of a series of four short stories about Nash’s adventures in dating while trying to win the heart of her true love, Anna.

smothered-and-coveredSmothered and Covered
The Adventures of Nash Wiley, Story 3

The last person Nash Wiley expects to bump into over a two a.m. breakfast at Waffle House is her college crush, decked out in a curve-hugging law enforcement uniform. Nash can’t believe her luck when Ms. Crush asks to join her, explaining that she’s just getting off shift. But something seems a little off. It could be the glitter in her eye shadow, or the black lace bra peeking from her barely buttoned uniform shirt, or maybe the exotic dancers who stroll in from the local gentleman’s club and crash their private reunion. Nash isn’t sure she’s still hungry until the waitress takes her order. “How you want those hashbrowns, hon?” Ms. Crush pins Nash with a sultry gaze and answers for her. “Mmm. I’ve heard she likes hers smothered and covered.”

privacy-glassPrivacy Glass
The Adventures of Nash Wiley, Story 4

As Nash Wiley entered the elegant Savannah Victorian and scanned the room she had one thought: This is one gay wedding that could really get out of hand. Only a lesbian would think it was a good idea to ask her long time ex to be maid of honor and then let Ms. Ex offer up a toast after drinking way too much white wine. But the evening turns even more surreal when Nash commandeers a stretch limo and her best friend for a late night drive out to the beach, and friendship turns into something more. Champagne on ice, seat belts optional and privacy glass a must.

The next February release, which is now available everywhere books are sold, is an adventure romance titled Birthright. This is a story I’ve wanted to write for a long time and I’m very excited to finally get to share it with readers. It’s the story of one hero’s journey to self-discovery and the love she finds when she arrives there.

birthright-6Birthright

When her spies bring news that a swordswoman imprisoned in a neighboring kingdom bears the Royal mark, Princess Kathryn sets out to rescue Aiden, the woman she’s sure is the true heir to the Belstaff throne and the solution to a tyrant’s campaign to overrun her small queendom of Olmstead.

That solution, however, is more of a problem. Too footloose for responsibility and distrustful of Kathryn’s selfless moral code, Aiden is a resistant heir. Her only interests are freedom and adventure. Despite their differences, Kathryn and Aiden discover common ground and a growing attraction as they set out on their mission to defeat the ruthless rogue ruler of Belstaff.

The true test lies ahead, when they find they must free their hearts to finally liberate their queendoms.

I hope you enjoy these stories! Thank you for reading.

Hootenanny 2016 – Day 11

A copy of Valley of Fire is up for grabs. Happy holidays!

Women and Words

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My friends, welcome to day 11 of the 2016 Hootenanny, in which we pretty much pulled out a bunch of stops and flooded your world with as many books as we possibly could (and tried not to lose our minds in the process…we’re not sure that didn’t happen yet, so check back later).

I’ll be honest. This place is a wreck. LOL. The furniture is covered with tinsel, reindeer, elves, pizza boxes, eggnog cartons…omg. But it’s okay, because nobody really sleeps during the Hootenanny, so what’s the point of trying to lie down? The elves have busted out the Twister game again and that’s been going on for a while. The neighbors came by with more eggnog (that’s so nice) and a bucket of fried chicken. That, too, is a nice change but omg we’re sure it’s not doing us any good in terms of healthy livin’. But hey, it’s…

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A Time for Vigilance

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Now, more than ever, is the time to show our love for one another, to stand up for common decency wherever we go and to create stories that celebrate our diversity.

Probably anyone who’s reading this blog post is still feeling wounded and in shock two days after the election. I live in California. I’m surrounded by people in shock. We can commiserate together. But I grew up in the Deep South, so I know the same support isn’t there for everyone. Those of us in safe zones have to reach out to those who aren’t. Those of us in safe zones have to speak out for those who can’t.

“A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in his heart, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in his heart. For the mouth speaks what the heart is full of.” Luke 6:45

I spoke to a family member in Mississippi yesterday who voted for Trump. He assured me that everyone who voted for Trump isn’t racist, that their vote was simply about economics and voting for an outsider. My reply was simple. If Trump isn’t racist then he should stop saying racist things.

I’m working on a memoir project that has required me to have some in-depth conversations with my father about racial bullying that happened in Alabama, in the 1970s when I was growing up. I asked him how a parent explains racism to a kid. I thought he’d have some wise answer for me, but he just said, you can’t. He said that all you can do is set a good example, tell your kids to do the right thing and stand up for those who can’t stand up for themselves.

I keep seeing Facebook posts from people who are unfriending folks who voted for Trump. I think part of why this election took us by surprise is that too many of us insulate ourselves and our social media platforms with people who think just like we do. I’ve tried not to do that, even though some posts make me angry. They are a shocking glimpse sometimes into how people you thought you knew actually think.

I’ve discovered that the folks who make me angry because of hurtful words in their Facebook posts also believe that they’re saying these things in a vacuum. They think they’re only talking to others who agree with them. Most of them are friends who live in the South. When I go home, they seem happy to see me. We have dinner together and I do believe they genuinely like me. I believe we really are friends. And when I join their conversations on Facebook they’ll say that they weren’t talking about me. They were and I’m there to remind them that they do know someone in the LGBT community. Me.

I’ve found that if you jump into one of these conversations with anger it doesn’t work. I usually try to say something that’s rather quiet just to let them know I’m listening. Conversations with people who don’t agree with you are important. Genuine conversation can change minds and help us understand each other. It’s not easy, but it might be the only way.

I was thinking of all of this as I was driving to work this morning. On the way in I stopped at a Starbucks and there were two Latina women in line behind me. The woman closest to me looked visibly upset and was standing pretty far from me. From behind I’m sure I just looked like some random white guy so she probably didn’t want to stand too close. I asked her if I could buy her a coffee. Her face immediately brightened. I think she was shocked. I bought the woman next to her a coffee as well.

You always see that stupid bumper sticker that says practice random acts of kindness. I say let’s make that real.

A pumpkin spiced latte is not going to save the world, but it’s a start.

Now is the time for vigilance, my friends.

Now is the time to show everyone that love is stronger, for real.